Acceptance rate sees uptick to 24% amid Covid-19 uncertainties

A+Preview+Days+2019+sign+on+the+Emma+Willard+House%2C+where+the+Office+of+Admissions+is+housed.+The+college+will+not+host+its+annual+Preview+Days+%E2%80%94%C2%A0or+any+other+in-person+admissions+events+%E2%80%94+this+year.

BENJY RENTON

A Preview Days 2019 sign on the Emma Willard House, where the Office of Admissions is housed. The college will not host its annual Preview Days — or any other in-person admissions events — this year.

By BOCHU DING

The college offered a total of 2,228 students admission to its class of 2024, comprising 24% of the 9,165 students who applied, according to Dean of Admissions Nicole Curvin. The overall admissions rate saw a major uptick from last year’s 16% — an 8% difference. 

21.5% of applicants received offers in the regular decision round, representing 1,836 of an applicant pool of 8,522. They join the 392 students accepted in the early decision I and II rounds, 30 of whom are Posse Scholars from Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. Bowdoin College, one of Middlebury’s peer schools, reported an all-time low regular decision acceptance rate of 8.3%.

Students of color made up 38% of those admitted and international students 10.5%. Accepted students hail from 65 countries and 49 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. 15.5% of accepted students will be the first to attend college in their families. 

The applicant pool was the third-largest in college history, falling short of record-breaking numbers for the classes of 2022 and 2023. More than a quarter of applicants were students of color and international students constituted just shy of another quarter, matching last year’s record levels. 

The office anticipates a total enrollment of 725–740 for the class of 2024, with 615–630 September enrollees and 110 February enrollees.

The unprecedented nature of the Covid-19 crisis made yield projections unreliable, since the college was unsure how the pandemic might influence the number of students who would accept their spots, according to Curvin in a previous interview with The Campus. 

“We’re doing our best to account for any sort of fluctuation that we might experience this year,” Curvin said.