College to Stop Sale of Energy Drinks

by / energy drinks (6) in News /

In a flyer released this week, Dining Services announced its decision to stop the sale of energy drinks on campus. The policy will take effect on March 7, 2016. Beverages such as Red Bull and 5-Hour Energy will no longer be available for purchase at any of the College’s retail locations. These locations include Midd Express, Wilson Café and The Grille. Guayaki Brand Yerba Mate, regarded as a healthier alternative to the previously identified energy drinks, will remain available for purchase.

The decision marked the culmination of a debate that began on Jan. 19, when Dining Software Intern Myles Kamisher-Koch introduced the topic in a Community Council meeting. In this meeting, Kamisher-Koch asserted that several Dining Services staff members approved of his proposal.

By presenting scientific research to demonstrate the several detrimental health effects of energy drinks, Kamisher-Koch ultimately argued that the sale of energy drinks violates Dining Services’ mission, stated on the College’s website, to “nourish and nurture today and tomorrow by sustaining mind, body and earth.” Kamisher-Koch’s data included a study finding that “up to 25 percent of current drinkers combine alcoholic beverages with energy drinks.” He also included reports that energy drinks promote poor academic tendencies and foster a “culture of stress.”

These concerns that Kamisher-Koch raised in his initial presentation appear to coincide with the opinions of several students on campus. “I learned in my psychology class that energy drinks are linked to high risk sex and drug use,” Jenna McNicholas ’19 said. Meg Knox ’19 agreed.

“The school has a responsibility to direct students to healthy choices through what they provide,” Knox said.

Opposition to this proposal in Community Council debate came mainly from students who believed the removal of energy drinks from campus shelves would violate a student’s right to choose what beverages they consume. Charles Rainey ’19 voiced his concern that this measure would lead to Dining Services “controlling what people consume,” and argued that he and others drink energy drinks responsibly, adding that the removal of the drinks from campus stores was too extreme a means of promoting student well-being.

However, those in support of the policy contended that Rainey’s concern was not a grave one. Fiona Mohamed ’18 stressed that the school would not be banning the consumption of energy drinks, but would be merely stopping their sale in retail locations on campus. Participants reminded those concerned with the change that they could buy the drinks at multiple retail locations situated close to campus.

Community Council held a vote on Kamisher-Koch’s recommendation on Tuedsay, Feb. 2. The proposal was approved 11 to 1, and Dining Services decided to adopt the resolution.

Dining Services’ flyer, signed by Executive Director of Food Service Dan Detora, echoes the Community Council’s sentiment. The flyer mentions scientific literature revealing a connection between energy drinks and unsafe behavior in young people, including “increased alcohol consumption, increased likelihood to drive while intoxicated, increased probability of use of other intoxicating substance and increased participation in high-risk sexual activity.” The flyer also restates Kamisher-Koch’s argument that the sale of energy drinks violates Dining Services mission, since, as the flyer reads, “consuming these products may result in serious health related issues such as; cardiovascular events, seizures and liver damage.”

6 responses to “College to Stop Sale of Energy Drinks”

  1. David Neuendorf says:

    Sounds like they are assuming causality, when it may well be that the same people who engage in dangerous practices also engage in consuming these drinks. The argument that the drinks are available in nearby retail stores just shows the futility of the on-campus ban. BTW, I never use any of these drinks, so I have nothing to gain by making them more available.

  2. Scott says:

    The ruling communist party has decided for you.

    Driving a vehicle could result in serious bodily harm or death. Effective immediately no one will be allowed to drive in or be a passenger in a vehicle while on campus.

    And everyone wonders why our culture is going to he!! in a hand basket!

  3. Luke says:

    “Energy drinks” are certainly not the best thing on earth to drink but from the article I believe that the research presented is highly flawed. The least flaw is the lack of a double blind component utilizing a control group. If Middlebury utilizes any public funding they could be opening themselves up for future problems.

  4. Mrquick says:

    Apparently, all of Earth’s problems have been solved, except maybe the effect of energy drinks on Middlebury students who courageously tackled the very last one problem on planet Earth. Now that this is taken care of, the World can sleep at ease.

    And some parents are willingly paying $50K/year for THAT….

    If I ever ever have the opportunity to interview Myles Kamisher-Koch for a job, I’ll make sure NOT to hire that idiot.

  5. Mrquick says:

    Myles Kamisher-Koch, the intern behind this removal, who self righteously positions himself as a champion of the students’ safety on campus, has no qualms killing animals, though…

    what a little hypocrite

  6. Guest says:

    Students have different ways of working and different study habits, and as adults should be able to chose whether or not they want to consume energy drinks. Cleary, there is a demand for them on campus, and not everyone has means of transportation to shop off campus. Really really frustrating move by the administration. Please don’t micro manage us.

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