The Middlebury Campus

Civic Environmental Engagement

By Julian Macrone

May 7, 2014

In the two years I’ve been writing this column, I’ve tried to minimize the chances that it might come off as just a repository for spewed sermons, and tried to focus more on the reporting responsibilities associated with editorial work. However, this is my last column in this wonderful paper, and...

Mind and Language, in a Nuthatch?

Mind and Language, in a Nuthatch?

By Julian Macrone

April 16, 2014

I watched a video recently of a trio of prominent philosophers discussing what’s been termed as the “linguistic turn” in contemporary philosophy. In a nutshell, the linguistic turn marked a movement, beginning with Nineteenth-Century German philosopher Gottlob Frege and culminating in the work...

A Drought in Confidence

By Julian Macrone

March 12, 2014

This past Sunday, a New York Times opinion piece entitled “Global Warming? Not Always” made the claim that “the scientific evidence does not support an argument that human-induced climate change has played any appreciable role in the current California drought.” To support his argument, NOAA ...

Methods of Environmentalism

By Julian Macrone

February 26, 2014

The discipline of political science has come quite a long way since Aristotle’s Politics, arguably the classic work in the study of politics, which asked and answered questions about our nature as political animals. Whereas Aristotle’s methods in that book were primarily observational and logica...

Splitting Atoms, Splitting Hairs

By Julian Macrone

January 22, 2014

Last Thursday I was fortunate enough to catch the screening of Pandora’s Promise in Dana Auditorium and the star-studded panel discussion that followed. The film offered an engaging narrative that provides an argument for nuclear energy that I’m sure supporters of the technology have been waiting...

Drops in the Bucket

By Julian Macrone

November 20, 2013

Akrasia is the ancient Greek word for “weakness of will,” or, in other words, acting against one’s better judgment. This past week makes me think that the U.S. might have itself a bad case of the stuff when it comes to climate questions. As Greenwire and The New York Times report, the EPA lowered...

Cutting Down on Political Anemia

Cutting Down on Political Anemia

By Julian Macrone

November 6, 2013

We know that preservation of the South American rain forests is a necessary step in ensuring our future a stable climate. Why, then, is illegal logging in the Amazon still so prevalent? Two weeks ago, the New York Times published a story explaining a recent chapter of Peru’s struggle to combat the black market timber industry ravaging its forests. The globa...

Clean Air and Blurred Lines

By Julian Macrone

October 16, 2013

The U.S. Supreme Court has a number of high-profile environmental cases on deck for this term. As Greenwire reports, the Court can choose to hear cases that concern challenges from independent parties and 17 states calling for a broad review of the Environmental Protection Agengy’s (EPA) greenhouse...

The Human Environment

By Julian Macrone

October 2, 2013

As someone whose academic interests lie primarily in the humanities and social sciences, I would hardly identify as someone who “does science.” However, I am also someone interested in the environment, specifically the ways our ideas about our environment fit in with the ideas we have about pretty...

Weighing in on the Weight of Neutrality

By Julian Macrone

May 8, 2013

News of the new Vermont Gas pipeline and the College’s announced endorsement of the project has created quite the stir among the community – and rightfully so. For a quick summary of the debate, see the dialogue that has taken shape between Zach Drennen‘13.5 and Cailey Cron‘13.5 and Anna Shireman-Grabowski‘15.5...

‘Reason’ and What Sustainability Teaches

By Julian Macrone

April 24, 2013

As the Campus’s editorial staff pointed out last week, on April 3 the National Association of Scholars released a report titled “What Does Bowdoin Teach?” Authored by Peter Wood and Michael Toscano, and funded by Tom Klingenstein (a Williams College alumnus), the report attempts to systematically examine ...

This Land Is Saved for You and Me

By Julian Macrone

April 10, 2013

Late last month, President Obama carried out his first major exercise of the powers granted to the president under the 1906 Antiquities Act, designating roughly 300,000 acres of land as new national monument area. This included land in New Mexico, Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, Washington State’s San Juan...

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